Investing In Gold And Silver For Capital Preservation And Appreciation

Buying Gold Sovereign Coins Is A Smart Way To Diversify In Precious Metals

Government and Federal Reserve problems have caused the United States to face serious financial issues. The Country's economic situation is not expected to continue anytime soon, and may in fact get worse as liberals continue to maintain power through 2012. The most significant issue at hand is an even further weakened Dollar. Investors can expect to face financial troubles as the world's leading currency faces significant troubles.


Government and Federal Reserve problems have caused the United States to face serious financial issues. The Country\’s economic situation is not expected to continue anytime soon, and may in fact get worse as liberals continue to maintain power through 2012. The most significant issue at hand is an even further weakened Dollar. Investors can expect to face financial troubles as the world\’s leading currency faces significant troubles.

As we know, investors around the world have already started pouring their money into precious metals-especially gold. Financial advisors today say that all investors should have 10 to 20 percent of their money invested in gold to hedge against a weakening dollar and inflation. Most of them are invested in gold bullion shares, also known as the exchange traded fund. However, we\’re talking of buying physical British Sovereign gold bullion coins.

The British Gold Sovereign as we now know it was first minted with 22-karat alloy in 1816, just at the start of the height of British Empire\’s power. The coins depict an image of Queen Elizabeth II on the front, while the reverse side depicts Pestrucci\’s \”St. George slaying the Dragon\”.

The first British Sovereign gold coins were minted under the direction of King Henry VII in 1489. They were in continuous production until they were discontinued under the rule of King James I. Not until George III took the throne were they re-introduced into circulation and production. The British Empire minted and issued the gold coins in great quantities from the time of George III until WWI, when the Empire came off the gold standard. Between WWI and 1932, production was reduced and all British Sovereign coins were minted only in Melbourne, Sydney, Perth, Bombay, Ottawa, and Pretoria.

The final regular issue of the British Sovereign was minted in 1932 at the Pretoria branch. That is, until 1957, when British Foreign Policy in the Middle East decided it would use British Sovereigns as payment for trade, so production commenced again. The Sovereigns were minted as bullion until 1982, when minting of the coins changed to proofs until 1999. In 2000, however, minting went back to the original form of bullion coins. The Royal Mint in Llantrisant, Rhondda Cynon Taff, Wales is the current minting location of the British Gold Sovereigns.

It\’s estimated that approximately one billion British Sovereign gold coins have been minted to date. But, the majority of them have been re-coined several times because of wear and tear. In the Victorian age in particular, a great deal of British Sovereign gold coins were removed from circulation to be re-coined. In addition to this fact, coins that fell below the minimum weight standard were exchanged for full weight coins.

For investors looking for a smart precious metals investment, British Gold Sovereigns are a great bet. The coins will give your portfolio the diversification you are looking for.

To learn more about and to invest in Gold Sovereign coins, visit Precious Metals Brokerage Group (www.pmbg.net) or call us at 866-775-3131.

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